Strength Training

 

 

(click HERE to check out Cancer Exercise App free in the Apple App store)

Join us, Monday, March 1st at 10:45am for strength building with ACSM certified Exercise Cancer Specialist, Amy Strom. This class will be held on Mondays and Wednesdays and will use hand weights, resistance bands, and your body weight. Be ready to get your fitness on! No previous experience needed, all skills levels are welcome to join. Click HERE to view the calendar and sign up.

Regular exercise can improve your mental and physical health during every treatment phase. Some treatments may cause muscle weakness. Muscle loss often happens when a person is less active while being treated. Strength training is here to help you maintain and build stronger muscles. A program that meets your needs can be a safe and successful way to improve well-being.

Following a well-designed exercise plan during and after treatment may be able to:

  • Lower the chance of having physical side effects, such as fatigue, neuropathy, lymphedema, osteoporosis, and nausea
  • Reduce the risk of depression and anxiety
  • Keep you as mobile and independent as possible
  • Improve your balance to reduce fall injuries
  • Prevent muscle loss and build strength
  • Improve sleep
  • Make your treatment more effective at destroying tumor cells
  • Improve survival rates for certain cancers, such as breast cancer and colorectal cancer
  • Improve quality of life

Source link here

During treatment, it is important to progress slowly and to listen to your body’s needs. This builds up your level of activity and keeps you from getting discouraged. Exercise in a safe environment that supports your immune system, while drinking plenty of water and eating a nutrient dense, balanced diet.

Take Charge – February 2021

The four classes in the Take Charge series include nutrition, exercise, side effects, and communicating with your healthcare team. Each class is 1 hour long and available online, this February. 

Take Charge: Nutrition

Eating healthy foods during and after treatment is key to feeling strong and giving your body adequate nutrition, but sometimes survivors may find it more challenging to eat than others. Nutritional needs vary, and eating well overall might help your body feel better, maintain strength, weight, nutrients, lower risk of infection, and help your body tolerate treatment related side-effects, as well as help you heal and recover faster (ACS, 2019). Join us Thursday, February 4th at 12:00 to learn more about using food as a tool to maintain and improve your health. Leading our virtual meeting is Noelle Butler, ND. Click HERE to check the calendar, register, and launch Zoom.

Nutrition handout

 

Take Charge: Exercise

Physical activity can improve mood, energy levels, and be beneficial in maintaining overall health. Evidence suggests “that moderate-intensity aerobic training and/or resistance exercise during and after cancer treatment can reduce anxiety, depressive symptoms, and fatigue and improve health-related quality of life and physical function” (NCI, 2020). Learn easy ways to incorporate exercise into your life during any stage of survivorship with certified personal trainer, Becky Franks, on Thursday, February 11th at 12:00. Click HERE to check the calendar, register, and launch zoom.

 

Take Charge: Side Effects

            Learn from Anna Buckmaster, DPT, CLT, on how Take Charge will assist you with reclaiming wellness. This class will also touch on the side effects survivors may encounter. Although each person’s experience may vary, side effects from surgery, treatment, and therapy can affect the body’s ability to absorb the proper amount of nutrients needed to keep it functioning at a healthy level. Some of these side effects include loss of appetite, nausea, changes in the way food tastes, and feeling full quickly. This series is comprised of open classes that address what you need at the time of transition on Thursday, February 18th at 12:00. Click HERE to check the calendar, register, and launch Zoom.

Side Effects handout

 

Take Charge: Communicating with Your Healthcare Team

This series is comprised of open classes that address what you need at the time of transition. When do you see your Oncologist? When do you see your General Practitioner? It can be confusing. Polly Knuchel, NP is here help you navigate communicating with your healthcare team as well as other questions that you have of this nature on Thursday, February 25th at 12:00. Click HERE to check the calendar, register, and launch Zoom.

 

 

Sources

American Cancer Society. (2019, July 15). Benefits of Good Nutrition During Cancer Treatment. www.cancer.org/treatment/survivorship-during-and-after-treatment/staying-active/nutrition/benefits.html

National Cancer Institute. (2020, February 10). Physical Activity and Cancer. National Institutes of Health. https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/obesity/physical-activity-fact-sheet

 

Healthy Dole Whips!

Taste the last days of summer with this delicious Pineapple Whip Recipe!

Throughout the changes of COVID, we are trying to reach more people in our community and make our educational programming more accessible, so we have created this recorded video. Enjoy and stay tuned for future recipes!

Follow this link to find the recipe! https://wellnessmama.com/124273/pineapple-whip-recipe/

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